What’s New

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Limited Release Wines call to pre-order!

May 9, 2019

Pink Moscato available for a Limited Time ONLY! Whisky Barrel Cab Merlot – LIMITED TIME Cabernet Merlot Blend – ripe berry fruit flavours wtih structured tannins and high acidity. A blend of peated and unpeated oak chips from genuine Whisky Barrels adds nuances of vanilla, tobacco & spice. Full body, Dry, Whisky Barrel Oak 13% …

Pink Moscato available for a Limited Time ONLY!

Whisky Barrel Cab Merlot – LIMITED TIME

Cabernet Merlot Blend – ripe berry fruit flavours wtih structured tannins and high acidity. A blend of peated and unpeated oak chips from genuine Whisky Barrels adds nuances of vanilla, tobacco & spice.

Full body, Dry, Whisky Barrel Oak 13% alcohol

 

Pacifica White – LIMITED TIME

Chile Chardonnay, Australian Semillon, New Zealand Sauvignon Blanc, Pacific North West Viognier

Acidity and excellent structure, this wine features flavours of peach, honeysuckle, apple-pear and tropical fruit.

Full body, Off-dry sweetness, 11.5% alcohol

905-438-8466 to Order!

Sunshine & Sangria!

February 19, 2018

NEW Blood Orange Sangria Island Mist is ready for the warmer weather and is sure to become a year-round favourite. Sweet and citrusy notes of juicy blood orange and ripe peach blend with crisp apple undertones for the perfect summer wine – fruity, refreshing and easy drinking. Also in store – the famous Raspberry Peach …

NEW Blood Orange Sangria Island Mist is ready for the warmer weather and is sure to become a year-round favourite. Sweet and citrusy notes of juicy blood orange and ripe peach blend with crisp apple undertones for the perfect summer wine – fruity, refreshing and easy drinking.

Also in store – the famous Raspberry Peach Sangria

What are Wine Diamonds?

May 26, 2015

What are Wine Diamonds? Wine Diamonds are tiny crystalline deposits that occur in wines when potassium and tartaric acid, both naturally occurring in grapes, bind together to form a crystal. Do Wine Diamonds Affect Wine Quality? No.  Actually, tartrate crystals are seen by winemakers and sommeliers as a sign of quality, including that the wine …

What are Wine Diamonds?

Wine Diamonds are tiny crystalline deposits that occur in wines when potassium and tartaric acid, both naturally occurring in grapes, bind together to form a crystal.

Do Wine Diamonds Affect Wine Quality?

No.  Actually, tartrate crystals are seen by winemakers and sommeliers as a sign of quality, including that the wine was not over processed.

Will Wine Diamonds Affect the Flavour of My Wine?

No. Wine crystals never impart an unpleasant taste

What Do Wine Diamonds Look Like?

Their appearance is like crystalized sugar granules or crystal shards as they fuse together.  They could also take on the look of a powdery white substance at the bottom of a wine bottle.  The crystals can also stick to the bottom of the cork.

Wine Diamonds are in my Bottle of Wine, How do I keep Them Out of my Glass?

Decanting or using an aerator with a screen works very effectively.

Avoiding Wine Diamonds

Wine Diamonds occur when wine is stores at cold temperatures.  Avoid Temperatures below 15 C or 60 F.  Avoid leaving wine in a cold care, garage, directly on a cement floor or cold storage.  This can affect the stability of wine allowing Wine Diamonds to form.

 

 

Two Glasses of Wine

August 1, 2014

Two glasses of Wine When things in your life seem almost too much to handle, when 24 hours in a day are not enough, remember the mayonnaise jar and the 2 glasses of wine… A professor stood before his philosophy class and had some items in front of him. When the class began, wordlessly, he …

Two glasses of Wine

When things in your life seem almost too much to handle, when 24 hours in a day are not enough, remember the mayonnaise jar and the 2 glasses of wine…

A professor stood before his philosophy class and had some items in front of him. When the class began, wordlessly, he picked up a very large and empty mayonnaise jar and proceeded to fill it with golf balls.
He then asked the students if the jar was full. They agreed that it was.

The professor then picked up a box of pebbles and poured them into the jar. He shook the jar lightly. The pebbles rolled into the open areas between the golf balls. He then asked the students again if the jar was full.  They agreed it was.

The professor next picked up a box of sand and poured it into the jar. Of course, the sand filled up everything else He asked once more if the jar was full. The students responded with a unanimous “yes.”

The professor then produced two glasses of wine from under the table and poured the entire contents into the jar, effectively filling the empty space between the sand. The students laughed.

“Now,” said the professor, as the laughter subsided, “I want you to recognize that this jar represents your life. The golf balls are the important things; your family, your children, your health, your friends, and your favorite passions; things that if everything else was lost and only they remained, your life would still be full. The pebbles are the other things that matter like your job, your house, and your car. The sand is everything else; the small stuff. If you put the sand into the jar first,” he continued, “there is no room for the pebbles or the golf balls.

The same goes for life. If you spend all your time and energy on the small stuff, you will never have room for the things that are important to you.

Pay attention to the things that are critical to your happiness. Play with your children. Take time to get medical checkups. Take your partner out to dinner. Play another 18. There will always be time to clean the house and fix the disposal.

Take care of the golf balls first; the things that really matter. Set your priorities. The rest is just sand.”

One of the students raised her hand and inquired what the wine represented.
The professor smiled. “I’m glad you asked. It just goes to show you that no matter how full your life may seem, there’s always room for a couple of glasses of wine with a friend.”

 

Introducing a bold, enigmatic blend from Selection

July 21, 2014

New ENIGMA from California has intense fruit aromas and notes of black cherry, coffee, chocolate and vanilla. Full bodied with a smooth, round finish.

New ENIGMA from California has intense fruit aromas and notes of black cherry, coffee, chocolate and vanilla.  Full bodied with a smooth, round finish.

Food friendly, this wine pairs well with everything from pizza to pasta and is a great match for meats like ribs or chicken with sweet and sticky marinade.

A Message from Katherine Heisler – Home Vintner vs Wine made at Wine Central

July 15, 2014

To my wonderful friends at Wine Central…   Oh, how I miss you!!  I’ve moved to Alberta to be closer to my daughters and am enjoying the closeness immensely.  However, in Alberta there is no such thing as a ‘wine on premises’ store.  We have lots of wine and beer making stores, but legally they …

To my wonderful friends at Wine Central…

 

Oh, how I miss you!!  I’ve moved to Alberta to be closer to my daughters and am enjoying the closeness immensely.

 However, in Alberta there is no such thing as a ‘wine on premises’ store.  We have lots of wine and beer making stores, but legally they can’t make the wine.  We have to do it at home.

 

Scene One:  On premises at Wine Central

            Walk in, have a great visit with Cosette, Rod, Maria, Brittney or Jane.  Find out what’s new, joke, choose a wine to make.  Wait, visit a little more while they mix it up, and then I sprinkle the yeast on.  Depending on how much visiting we do, the stop may last 5 to 20 minutes.  Then on with my busy day.

 

Scene One ‘A’:  Home in Alberta

            Drive to the wine and beer making store, choose a wine to make.  Lug it out to the car, put it in the trunk.  Head home.  Grab the primary, scrub it with Sparklebrite, then rinse it thoroughly.  Make a solution of Metabisulphite and sterilize anything coming into contact with the wine.  Rinse.  Remove the packaging from the kit, add hot water to the primary fermentor, stir in the bentonite.  Pour the wine concentrate into the primary – but be careful!  It’s heavy!  It’s liquid!  It splashes!  Add water, and stir like crazy.  Sprinkle the yeast on top, just like adding salt to your French fries.  Next, move the primary (about 55 pounds of wine and equipment) to a shelf at least 3 feet off the floor.  Then, go wash the floor where you made the wine.  Relax, grab a glass of wine you made last year.

 

Scene One ‘B’:  Home in Alberta

            A week later.  Time to rack the wine.  Clean the carboy with Sparklebrite, then sanitize with Metabisulphite.  Make sure to clean and sanitize the hose as well.  Suck hard to get the wine flowing (the wine on premises store are much more sanitary about this part), and move the wine from the primary to the carboy, leaving the sediment behind.  Clean and sanitize the airlock and bung, and top the carboy with them.  Then you get to clean.  Wash out any left over wine and sediment in the primary, then clean with the Sparklebrite, rinse, sterilize, rinse and put away.  Hopefully you don’t have to wash the floor this time.

 

Scene One ‘C’:  Home in Alberta

            10 days later:  Clearing and stabilizing!   This is funJ  Clean and sterilize a small cup, a whisk, a large jug, the expensive whip you just bought, and wipe down the power drill you have seized from your husband’s workshop.  Pour out a couple of cups of wine – careful – heavy – wet – splashes – into the large jug.  Mix the chemicals according to directions, add to the carboy, then whip it like a rented mule.  One direction until it starts to swirl, then reverse the direction.  Do this for at least one minute, usually two.  Then add the final Chitosan or Islinglass and whip it again.  Try to avoid foaming…but it will happen occasionally.  Pour the remaining wine back into the carboy.  Top with a newly cleaned and sterilized airlock and bung.  Clean the floor.  Clean the equipment and put it away for next time.

 

Scene One ‘D’:  Home in Alberta

            After 8  days you will rack your wine.  This will clarify it, and help you produce a clear, wonderful wine.  Yes, you guessed it:  clean and sterilize a fresh carboy, hose and tip.  Suck hard, and get that wine moving from one carboy to the other.  Leave the sludge behind.   Clean and sanitize the airlock and bung, and fasten to the new carboy.  Hopefully you were good enough you don’t have to clean the floor this time!

 

Scene One ‘E’:  Home in Alberta

            Rack your wine again so you won’t have sediment.  Clean and sterilize a fresh carboy, hose and tip.  Move the wine, clean and sanitize the airlock and bung, and reseal.  You’re getting really good now…no floor mopping this time.

 

Scene Two:  On premises at Wine Central

            Show up for your appointment!  Your wine is ready for bottling.  It’s been looked after, loved and coddled.  It’s filtered, and ready to bottle.  Put your bottles in the machine, wait 4 minutes, take them out, line them up, and start filling.  The automatic filler is great!  Two bottles at a time, and the levels are great.  An automatic corking machine saves your back from aches and pains.  Labels go on easily, shrink capsules take a second.  Beautiful!!  Let the wonderful staff load them in your car.  When you get home, grab the kids or your husband to help unload.

 

Scene Two ‘A’:  Home in Alberta

            Rack your wine into a newly cleaned and sanitized primary or carboy to leave any sediment behind.  Don’t forget to clean and sanitized the hose.

            Take all your bottles and soak them in a solution of Sparklebrite for at least 20 minutes.  Then rinse with clean water.  Sanitize them with Metabisuphite solution, then rinse and drain. 

            Make sure your wine is at least 3 feet off the floor.  Clean and sanitize your bottling tip.  Insert the hose and bottling tip into each bottle, and fill to the proper level.  Cork.  Fill.  Cork.   28 to 30 times.  Add a label if you have any energy left.  Date the bottles – there aren’t any labeling machines here!  If you want to have the shrink wraps on the bottles, move the wine to the kitchen, and hold the bottles with shrinks on over a boiling kettle to shrink.   Once you’ve finished, clean and sanitize the equipment.  Wash down the corker.  Wash the floors.   Have a shower.

 Go pour yourself a glass of wine.  You deserve it!

 Of all the things I miss about Kelowna, Wine Central is at the top of the list!!  You make wine making so easy.  And so great!

             

What’s the Difference Between Pinot Grigio and Pinot Gris?

March 7, 2014

What is the difference between Pinot Grigio and Pinot Gris most will ask?  They are actually the same grape variety, however, Pinot Gris originates in France and across the border in Italy is where Pinot Grigio is known. Pinot Grigio is typically lighter bodied, crisp, fresh with a touch of spice.  Whereas, Pinot Gris wines are more …

What is the difference between Pinot Grigio and Pinot Gris most will ask? 

They are actually the same grape variety, however, Pinot Gris originates in France and across the border in Italy is where Pinot Grigio is known.

Pinot Grigio is typically lighter bodied, crisp, fresh with a touch of spice.  Whereas, Pinot Gris wines are more full-bodied, richer, spicier and more viscous in texture.

When pairing food with these wines – Pinot Grigio being lighter is best suited with light dishes such as fish or light appetizers.  In contrast the richness of a Pinot Gris works together with something

heavier such as veal chops, chicken casseroles and most hard cheeses.

So the next time you get together with friends, have a taste test and ask them if they can detect the differences in the two wines.